Friday, May 20, 2005

Kiltering

I've been puzzled about what to do. Yes, I'm trying a new smaller homeschooling group on Monday. Yes, my heart beats faster, and I'm doing rapid-eye-analysis trying to figure out the pitfalls and pitchforks around every bend of it. Nothing seems so evil as a corporate group of homeschooling mothers right now. Marilyn Manson, hello.
I think I'll tell them right up front instead of hoping/hoping that Cody is accepted "as-is" w/o explanation.
"We took Cody out of school because given his mild autism diagnosis, he was struggling with overwhelming sensory and social stimuli, not to mention physical health issues."
Way too scientific?
"Yes, it was stressing him and our family out tremendously." (Should I really reach out for sympathy like that?)
"We are continuing to work on these issues, and, even within these groups, I will need to coach and listen in order to help him understand appropriate social behavior."
Ooooh that word "appropriate" will make them fear for their children like the last lady did. He's not inappropriate like that, just a goofball who may say things in weird ways. He desperately wants to be cool and liked, therefore, he tries too hard and is off kilter.
Then, it would be aired. Perhaps I should have done that with the other woman; the one that recoiled, yet I truly think her views of "normal" were determined into hard rock code.
That reminds me of what Lianne Holliday Willey wrote in her book, "Pretending to be Normal":
"Yet no matter the hardships, I do not wish for a cure to Asperger's Syndrome. What I wish for, is a cure for the common ill that pervades too many lives; the ill that makes people compare themselves to a normal that is measured in terms of perfect and absolute standards, most of which are impossible for anyone to reach."
I like that re-look at normalcy.
Well, I will girder myself for Monday, re-read a bit more of Willey's tactics for disclosure, and pray that there will be some inclusive Marilyns at hand.
:)

1 comment:

Cindy said...

"What I wish for, is a cure for the common ill that pervades too many lives; the ill that makes people compare themselves to a normal that is measured in terms of perfect and absolute standards, most of which are impossible for anyone to reach."

I have been very heavily weighted down with this lately, struggling to resist guilt for not measuring up to a "normalcy" that is actually perfectionism. Your sentence expressed it much more succinctly than my internal thrashing, however. :) Thanks.